Visual Studies Ph.D.

The History of Art and Visual Culture Department (HAVC) at the University of California at Santa Cruz offers a course of study leading to the Ph.D. in Visual Studies. The Ph.D. is designed to steep our graduates in the most theoretically relevant methodologies for understanding the significance of visual artifacts and the social and cultural qualities of human vision; provide students with exposure to a range of cultural perspectives and visual artifacts drawn from around the world; and cultivate in our graduates the necessary skills and knowledge to secure and excel in academic and curatorial positions. The program is both interdisciplinary and flexible. Students work closely with their advisors and the Director of Graduate Studies to craft a personalized course of study that advances their intellectual and professional goals.

The program employs a wide range of visual evidence for examination, without being constrained by traditional hierarchies of art or art history. Fine arts, architecture, photography, film, performances, utilitarian objects, and popular entertainments all are primary source material for scholars in the field. The program at Santa Cruz is particularly adept at illustrating significant differences in how disparate cultural groups interpret their visual worlds, given the breadth of cultural perspectives taught by our faculty.  With scholars focusing on cultures in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific Islands, Visual Studies at Santa Cruz offers students an unparalleled opportunity to consider the role of social and cultural forces in guiding how and what their members see. 

Applications for 2015-16 will be accepted from October 1- December 15, 2014. For official information about the application process, please visit the UCSC Graduate Division and their application instructions.

 

Visual Studies Planned Learning Outcomes

Graduates from the Visual Studies Ph.D. program will have demonstrated the following:

PLO 1. Core Knowledge. Students will demonstrate mastery of the history of visual culture theory and methods by being able to describe and analyze the internal and external criticisms, debates, and reformulations of the field, both historical and current.

PLO 2. Research. Students will demonstrate the ability to use research methods and analysis appropriate for carrying out their independent and original research.

PLO 3: Pedagogy: Students will demonstrate the ability to plan curricula and learning programs, to express ideas clearly and explain them to others, and to assess student work fairly and accurately.

PLO 4. Scholarly Communication. Students will demonstrate effective communication skills in presenting research findings in oral and written forms.

PLO 5. Professionalism. Students will demonstrate professional preparation including the ability to write grants, to submit publications to journals and presses, and to participate in professional organizations and conferences.