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Maggie Wander

Material and visual cultures of Oceania, environment and ecology, Indigenous media, Native American material and visual culture, settler colonial history
Research Interests: 

My dissertation project looks at various modes by which artists, curators, and cultural practitioners in Oceania reimagine human interactions with space, place, and other-than-human life forms. This materializes in many different modes including installation art, digital media, curatorial practice, public art, and community collaborations. By focusing on a wide range of modalities from across the expansive region of Oceania that re-orient the focus to notions of personhood in relation to the natural environment, I hope to complicate discourses of climate change, environmental justice, and the role of settler colonization in the perpetuation of ecological issues in the Pacific. 

Office: 
Kresge 228
Selected Publications: 

“Artefacts of Encounter: Cook’s Voyages, Colonial Collecting, and Museum Histories (Review),” in The Contemporary Pacific 29, no. 2 (Forthcoming, 2018).

“The Making of Asmat Art: Indigenous Art in a World Perspective, by Nick Stanley (Review),” in The Contemporary Pacific 29, no. 1 (2017): 220-222.

“Edgar Heap of Birds (Review),” in Alternative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 12, no. 1 (2016): 103-114.

Selected Presentations: 

“O'ahu Time-Travel: How Sean Connelly is Shifting the Past to Reimagine Hawaiʻi's Future.” Presentation at the Oceanic Memories Conference, Christchurch, Aotearoa New Zealand, November 29 – December 3, 2017.

“Canoes and Koas: Materializing Indigenous Knowledges and Sustainable Futures in Hawaiʻi.” Presentation at the European Society for Oceanists, Munich, Germany, June 29-July 2, 2017.

“‘Talking Back’ to Settler Colonialism: How the Karrabing Film Collective’s Windjarrameru (The Stealing C*nt$) Responds to a History of Erasure.” Presentation at Friday Forum for Graduate Research, Institute for Humanities Research, UCSC, February 24, 2017.

“‘Talking Back’ to Settler Colonialism: How the Karrabing Film Collective’s Windjarrameru (The Stealing C*nt$) Responds to a History of Erasure.” Presentation at the College Art Association, New York City, NY, February 16-18, 2017.

Teaching Interests: 

Graduate Student Instructor, HAVC 172 Textile Traditions of Oceania, Fall 2017

Teaching Assistant, HAVC 100A Approaches to Visual Studies, Winter 2017

Teaching Assistant, HAVC 70 Visual Cultures of the Pacific Islands/Oceania, Fall 2016

Teaching Assistant, HAVC 170 Art of the Body in Oceania, Spring 2016

Honors and Awards: 

Social Science Research Council Dissertation Proposal Development Program, University of California Santa Cruz and the Social Science Research Council

Arts Dean's Fund for Excellence, Arts Division, UCSC

Center for Archival Research and Training Fellowship, McHenry Library Special Collections and Archives, UCSC

Regent’s Fellowship, History of Art and Visual Culture, UCSC

Education and Training: 
B.A., History of Art and Visual Culture, UCSC, Magna Cum Laude and Highest Honors